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20121129
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, the nine justices that occupy its chambers carry a heavy responsibility. they have the final say on the law of the land. the principles and idea that guide their decisions are the subject of heated debate. justice antonin scalia is the longest serving justice currently on the court, he is the leading voice for a conservative judicial philosophy known as textualism, some talk about it as originalism. it asserts that laws must be interpreted as they were understood by the men who wrote them. in 2006, justice elena kagan, then the dean of hear extraordinary law school, scalia's alma mater says he is the justice who has had the most important impact over the years on how we think and talk about law. he originally coauthored a new book, it is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text. i am very honored to have justice scalia back on this program. so the first book was about arguing, how to make the case arguing the case. this is called reading law, the interpretation of legal text written brian a. garner -- >> as the earlier book was. >> rose: exactly. so what did you hope to accompl
of law, which is all important? -- how can egypt fulfilled a rule of law, which is all important? >> kurram burk, egypt only have one is -- remember, egypt only have one institution before the revolution, the military. what egypt is trying to do simultaneously is find leaders, build institutions, and meet the aspirations that had been billed very high during a very successful and peaceful revolution. that is not easy. it will take time to build institutions and impose the role of -- the rule of law. >> the ceasefire in gaza, will that help to win egypt friends abroad? >> i think it shows they play a special role in the middle east. and they are regaining their traditional role in the region. it is good as long as the president does not believe he can then take about -- take that and cashed in for a grant of power, which is the concern of some. >> do you think he is the leader to take them into the near future? greta i think he was -- >> i think he was elected democratically in a free and fair election. think of egypt as slowly putting in place all of the various elements of a cou
to the system do you think are required? how deep? >> please understand that current law, the president's law right now, the law of the land, makes it so that medicare, medicaid and social security all are on a road to insolvency. that's the current law. we believe that those three programs, medicaid, medicare and social security need to be saved and strengthened and secured. through our budget proposal we've had out the last two years we have put forward a proposal that actually makes it so that current retirees, current medicare recipients see no change whatsoever but in fact we save and secure the program for future generations. that the medicaid program which again is on a path to insolvency and states are complaining vociferously about this that we actually save that program from a financial standpoint. there are wonderful proposals on the table about solving and saving social security. you can't address the spending issues without fundamental really form and real solutions for medicare, medicaid and social security. >> brown: just to stay with you, won't those be unpopular? after this e
. >> where can we go? we are being killed. we ask the world to help for our children. we must prevail. is law must prevail. -- is lamed he must prevail. >> many have families in the tents. >> we have been here for seven months. it is the safest place we can find. but even here we are afraid we will be shelled. >> turkey is reluctant to take more refugees, so a little it has got to go further. people cling to what little dignity they can, that they are despairing that anyone will bring this to an end. >> the misery of life for syria because the refugees as winter comes on, the conditions in camp will only get worse. less than a week after the end of fighting between cost and israel, egyptian mediators have started talks with both sides to work on details of the ceasefire. with discussions underway, a hamas has been for the first time allowed to control the border area between israel and gaza to control the violence. our correspondent is there. >> there is a high chance we would have been killed if we had tried to come here just a couple of weeks back. but the cease-fire means israel has lifted
i did not see, the protesters are claiming is this -- i do not it imposes sharia law across the government. they claim it is not adequate to protect the separation of powers, to keep women in the 21st century instead of the stone age. not one person in the constitutional assembly is female. they say it does not protect it. what i am saying is, get in the game. it is time to go back to the table. i might give this advice to the congress, in our country, go back to the table and hammer it out. if both sides are dissatisfied, that means it is a good compromise. >> i wonder if we're expecting too much of a country that has had two decades of leadership. you point out the american example. it is a very fragile as well. >> of the risks are huge. morsi had two good, impressive successes last week. one of them in -- was brokering a ceasefire in gaza, which is also fragile and holding for now. the second is the effort he has made to get the imf to commit four $0.8 billion in loans with billions from the european union and maybe some money from us, depending on congress, to follow. th
of the regulations in dodd- frank financial reform. about a quarter of the law's new rules from s.e.c. remain incomplete. though critics say she wasn't forceful enough against wall street executives, president obama today praised her leadership. saying quote, "...the s.e.c. is stronger and our financial system is safer and better able to serve the american people-- thanks in large part to mary's hard work." >> reporter: the president's choice to replace shapiro, elisse walter would finish the 13 months left on the current term as chairman. walter served as interim chairman before shapiro took over. the administration has until next december to nominate a new chairman for a full term. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: joining us now with more on the s.e.c., john coffee, securities law professor at columbia university. you know, jack, mary schapiro got lots of criticism for her years at the sec, whether you want to talk about lax supervision for the whole persony maddoff scandal, she gets criticized for it. as she leaves the sec what kind of shape is that agency in? >> well, i think
vii of the civil rights act, which as you know is our antidiscrimination law. under. the supervisors is imbued with the employer's authority. an employer can be held liable if a nonsupervisor employee harasses another employee. but it's tougher to prove. you have to shout employer knew or should have known about the harassment and failed to act. maida vance brought this lawsuit against ball state university. she's an african american woman working in the dining services division of the university, claimed she was harassed by a white coworker, was slapped on the head, blocked at the elevator, racial epithets were used such as "sambo" and "buckwheat" in her presence. she complained and finally brought her lawsuit against the university. she lost in the lower courts. the lower court, federal appellate court, said this coworker was not a supervisor, and took the definition that is probably the most restrictive-- that is, the supervisor has to be somebody who can make a tangible employment decision, such as hiring and firing. >> brown: today it made its way to the supreme court, and her l
, it is not an automatic. if they do pursue citizenship-- which they can under the law as it is today-- they would go behind the people who are already in line so that there is a fairness in the system to those who have waited for years to become regularized. but they will have a preference in that they will be here legally, can work, and build up all of their seniority while they are waiting in the line. >> suarez: senator, would you say the prospects for a bill of this kind have changed? have gotten better since the election? >> i do think that people are now realizing that we've got to have immigration reform and speaking only for myself i believe that doing immigration reform in pieces is going to be achievable rather than trying to do comprehensive which gets bogged down in extraneous issues that make it very hard to come to a total big conclusion. >> suarez: representative gutierrez, today the hispanic caucus laid out a set of principles it would want to see in any immigration reform bills. given what you and the caucus members said today, is the senator's achieve proposal at least a place to b
greece to actually change its laws so private creditors could no longer sue to collect if enough other creditors, like the e.c.b., also owned greek debt. could that serve as model for other countries? well, once you start changing laws, says hans humes, the sky's the limit. >> right now, we're teetering on something that's far worse than what we saw in latin america. >> reporter: in the 1980s or '90s you mean. >> yeah, i mean i lived in latin america, i saw it and i was part of the workout. this is worse. >> reporter: does lee buchheit then... >> have a lot of work? ( laughter ) >> reporter: yeah, i'm sure he has a lot of work, but does he bear a lot of the blame? >> no, no. i mean he's just reacting to the situation that's evolving. but i think there's a lot of concern that, if you have this legal coaching on how to really gut creditor rights, that you may actually end up in a situation where nobody wants to lend to countries. >> reporter: but if that's already a clear and present danger, we wondered why not just stiff the creditors? after all the history of sovereign debt is default,
. and the tax law in many cases is not progressive. i think the tax law should be progressive. i think that when people make $15 or $20 million or $200 million and pay a 10% rate i think something should be done about that. >> rose: then people step forward and say well, that's because most of the income comes from dividends which is taxed at a lower rate. >> they would probably say most of it comes from capital gains and it taxed at a lower rate. >> rose: i mean capital gains. >> this just makes sure people who have really high incomes pay at the a rate that the people next door to them are. >> rose: if you had automatic powers to establish what the tax rate should be both for capital gains and ordinary income, what would you set it at? >> well, i would probably have -- i would probably feel that capital gains should be at least at the 25% level and i would -- and dividends should be as ordinary income and i would have a more progressive tax system than we have. but since the lobbyists and the lawyers for the rich are so good at getting around these things i would have a minimum tax so no matte
are a key part of the health insurance reform law's efforts to expand the number of americans with coverage. we spoke with the head of the largest health insurer in florida, blue cross blue shield. patrick geraghty is the chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue. >> tom: pat, thank you for joining us tonight. will blue cross, blue shield participate if there is a health exchange in the state of florida? >> we absolutely will. we will position our company to be part of any distribution channel that is out there. >> tom: how has enrollment been? >> enrollment -- it's not in the exchange yet, but enrollment in our company, we're over 83,000 new members this year, and we've got over 60,000 new members sold for 1/1/13. >> tom: how many of those new members have existing health insurance. how many are moving from uninsured to insured. >> almost all of those members have health insurance right now. we haven't seen the big movement from uninsured to insured happening yet. >> tom: in the past three years, florida has been number three in the united states, among states with the number of uninsured reside
the privilege of working with my daughter and my son-in-law, it is a departure in that it is stylistically difference and has no narration which we have been, i think gratefully dependent on all of these years and it works that way, and yet it is not a departure, in that we have been dealing and we have been talking about this for 20 years, about race in america, and what it means, whether it is you you in jazz, whether it is heroic in baseball and jackie robinson, whether it is the civil war or jack johnson and having to do with the darker, underbelly of it in this country. it is the sub theme of american life you can't the help but bump into if you are going to scratch the surface of just about anything. >> rose: this is one chapter in a long history of america of race. >> and it is what drew sarah in and i think, you know, it is what continually interests me. >> rose: will this change your life in terms of what you might want to do with your life? >> well, yeah, i mean, we are already begun or next project, collaborating on another film so -- >> rose: the two of you have? >> yes. and da
was spent by groups not required by law to disclose their donors. for more on where all that money went, what it bought, and what it means for future elections we turn to two reporters who've been tracking those numbers: matea gold of "the los angeles times." and eliza newlin carney, who covers this for "roll call" newspaper. and we thank you both for being with us. matea gold, let me start with you. most expensive election in history. how did that manifest itself? >> well, i think there's no question money played a remarkable and prominent role in this campaign in a way we haven't seen in recent years. this was the first presidential campaigns since a series of important federal government decisions, including the supreme court's decision in citizenses united that opened the door to more outside spending. that's what drove us to the record $6 billion spending you mentioned. outside groups played this enormous role, both pummeling the airwaves with ads from the presidential campaigns and senate and house races. i think there's no question they made the tenor of all the campaigns much mo
care. i'm going to transform government. i'm going to transform law." or in this case "i'm going to transform marketing." so we have the chance of performing the kind of innovation and software development that we've gotten good at in the computer industry for computer applications and applying much more broadly. this is a big change in the computer industry itself and this is a very big change in many industries that are being -- essentially effected or transformed. retail is a big one. right now in the process of -- software is eating retail and marketing is right for it and there's a huge progress in software base marketing in the last 20 years. but there's another big innovation that is right to happen right now. which is marketing becoming a software becoming enabled and powered through applications. >> so what would you most like mark? i'll begin with you. people in this audience who come here marketing as advertising geniuses to understand about the revolution that you know a whole lot about? what is your take away from what you have to say? >> i think it's -- we're on the
, yes, i did, although i was working part-time at the, the law was you could earn up to a very small amount a week without forfeiting housing benefit which was the thing that was keeping us home so i worked up to that amount, i had a clerical job in a church at one point, so -- and then i was teaching, but we were still existing partly on benefits, i couldn't wholly support us and then the miracle happened. harry was published, and we really didn't look back after a few months, it changed my life. but that period, that period of my life was a formative experience for me, and it shaped my world view, and it always will shape my world view. the experience of having been part of a mass of people who are very voiceless, the experience of being scapegoated and stigmatized because that was the political climate at that time, really has colored my world view ever since and i don't think i will ever lose that. >> define what you mean, i think i know what you mean by world view. >> in that, it is a frightening experience to become a statistic, to almost fall off the radar of what people think
on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself, basically, until there's a constitution? >> well, he did a lot of little things. he dismissed the old prosecutor, seen as a hold-over from the old rejewel. he promised new trials. but the main thing that he did was to take all of his actions, and place them outside of court review. and he also made impossible to disband the constitutional assembly that is now writing the document. he had already assumed not simply presidential powers but legislative powers. that he did in august. what he is doing right now what, he
that are in the bracelet. probably 15 years ago or so, my sister-in-law, who had the earrings, she sold those to me. okay. this is called sporting motif jewelry. it's a reverse crystal bracelet. and the technique is really interesting. the jeweler actually takes a piece of rock crystal that's been rounded and smoothed out and he carves it from behind. he carves out the exact image and then it's painted from behind as well. at that point, it's backed with mother of pearl. so you can see a little bit of the shine behind the actual crystal-- that is mother of pearl. and then it's joined together with a stirrup strap and this snaffle bit, which is a really great motif. so it's all in keeping with the actual piece. we've got a hound dog, we've got a horse, a fox and completed with the other two at the end as well. when we go to appraise these, we always take a look at the quality of the carving and how well it's done and executed. the detail on the dog and the little whiskers are really crisp. i can tell you've taken really good care of it. it's in really good condition. reverse crystal can get scratched easi
again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was a day of urgent diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and rockets between israel and hamas. rumors of
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)